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Breast CancerWomen diagnosed with breast cancer face incredible obstacles and overcome overwhelming odds on their road to recovery. Among those obstacles is chemotherapy, which notoriously causes patients to lose their hair temporarily. What patients don’t know is that with one specific chemo drug – Taxotere – hair may never return.

In some women, Taxotere kills hair follicles with no way to reverse the damage, resulting in a lifetime of baldness. Even though Taxotere’s manufacturer knew about this for more than 20 years, it was kept from doctors and the public until just six months ago. Our Taxotere attorneys report on how the drugmaker got away with this deception and the stories of breast cancer survivors who now face a lifetime of alopecia.

Doctors started using Taxotere to treat breast cancer in 1996. Ten years later, an oncologist in Denver published the first study linking Taxotere to permanent hair loss. Dr. Sedlacek found that more than 6% of women treated with Taxotere experienced “persistent significant alopecia,” meaning permanent hair loss. Hair loss was especially common among women also treated with the drugs Taxotere with Adriamycin and Cyclophosphaamide.

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pill bottleWe recently wrote about a new, growing type of cancer center focused on immunotherapy and collaboration between top doctors. Our Actos attorneys are happy to report that a new immunotherapy drug, Tecentriq, has been approved to treat bladder cancer.

As our Actos bladder cancer clients know, there have not been any important improvements in bladder cancer treatment in many years. Tecentriq is an immunotherapy drug, meaning it unleashes the body’s own immune system to attack tumors.

Tecentriq is part of a class of immunotherapy drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, and is the first of its kind approved for bladder cancer. Specifically, the drug targets urothelial carcinoma, which makes up about 90% of all bladder cancers.

Bladder cancer patients are in such urgent need for a new treatment that the FDA approved Tecentriq four months ahead of schedule. Traditional treatments – chemotherapy, radiation and surgery – are sometimes successful but often not. Bladder cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.

Of more than 77,000 bladder cancer diagnoses each year, two-thirds of the cases are in men. Certain factors increase your likelihood of developing bladder cancer. Some are obvious, like smoking cigarettes and exposure to certain chemicals. Others are more insidious, such as taking the diabetes drug Actos.

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debtOur Abilify lawyers are currently accepting cases involving compulsive behavior. The FDA recently added warnings to Abilify’s labels detailing the drug’s link to uncontrollable urges for sex, gambling, shopping, and eating.

Abilify (aripiprazole) is prescribed to treat depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, among other mental disorders. It is prescribed to approximately 1.6 million Americans.

Since Abilify’s approval 14 years ago, the FDA has gathered information on the drug from patients, doctors and medical literature. By far the most common problem associated with Abilify is pathological gambling. All patients who experienced problematic side effects started the compulsive behavior after beginning Abilify, and all patients said their symptoms stopped or significantly reduced after stopping the drug.

If you’re interested in reading more detailed cases of specific Abilify side effects, check out our first blog on Abilify gambling lawsuits.

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pink pillsMore than 4,500 plaintiffs have filed lawsuits against Xarelto’s manufacturer over the drug’s side effects, including uncontrollable bleeding and death. Despite these mounting lawsuits, U.S. officials just approved the drug for extended patent protection, so Xarelto will only be available under brand name until 2024. Our team of Xarelto lawyers examines this patent extension and how it affects our Xarelto clients.

Xarelto is a blood thinner (or anticoagulant) very similar to Pradaxa. It is approved for seven conditions, including stroke, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

In a time when U.S. consumers are spending $310 billion per year on prescription drugs, one can’t help but wonder why government officials approve patent extensions for brand-name drugs like Xarelto. Particularly because Xarelto is simply a newer, shinier version of the original blood thinner that has been used for 60 years and is just as safe and effective.

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breast cancer ribbonTaxotere, a popular chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer, is causing permanent hair loss in thousands of women. As a wave of litigation hits the drug’s manufacturer, our team of Taxotere lawyers details how this drug evaded FDA and public scrutiny for so long.

Temporary hair loss from chemotherapy treatments is well known and accepted. Like other chemotherapies, Taxotere is given through injection, causing a range of side effects from mouth sores to nausea. Until 2010, Taxotere’s labels explicitly stated that hair generally grows back after treatments stop. Now, we know that this claim is not true, has never been true, and that the manufacturer knew all along.

Taxotere is made by Sanofi and was approved in 1996. To boost sales, Sanofi executives set into motion a marketing scheme to misrepresent the safety and effectiveness of Taxotere’s off-label uses (meaning prescribing the drug for anything other than breast cancer treatment) to increase the market and profits. Saofi also paid doctors to persuade them to prescribe Taxotere off-label.

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cash syringeOur Xarelto lawyers know all too well that Big Pharma hides important data from the public to protect their most profitable drugs. There are thousands of death and injury claims against Xarelto  federal court, where a legal briefing was just filed accusing the manufacturers of misleading editors of one of the world’s most respected medical journals.

Patients injured by Xarelto – a popular blood thinner – are suing its manufacturers, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and Bayer, because the drug can cause uncontrollable, fatal bleeding. These wrongful death and injury lawsuits accuse the companies of concealing important safety information and failing to test the drug fully before releasing it for sale.

To prove these claims in court, Xarelto lawyers recently pointed to a letter published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). The letter was written by Duke University researchers and led to the FDA’s approval of Xarelto in 2011.

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gamblingAbilify, a powerful antipsychotic medication, is the top-selling drug in the United States, earning more in sales than all other major anti-depressants combined. The drug is intended to treat depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Tourettes by changing patients’ behavior. Sadly, studies have linked Abilify to reward-seeking behaviors like gambling and compulsive spending, causing the destruction of families, careers and personal lives.

Our team of Abilify lawyers examines the link between Abilify and gambling and the lawsuits filed against its manufacturer.

Abilify was approved in 2002 in the same class of drugs as Seroquel, Risperdal and Zyprexa. It may surprise many to know that neither the FDA nor doctors understand exactly how Abilify works in helping mental illness. There is a proposed theory of mechanism, but no medical research or evidence to confirm it. Abilify is the only antipsychotic that acts on the dopamine system, however, which may hold the key to the development or worsening of uncontrollable urges.

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ViagraTwo years ago, a study was published linking Viagra to a heightened risk of melanoma, the most fatal form of skin cancer. We wrote about the study previously, here, but our team of Viagra lawyers wants to update our readers on recent expert opinions and Viagra lawsuit news.

In the 2014 study, researchers had more than 200,000 men fill out a health and lifestyle questionnaire every two years, for one decade. The questionnaire included questions about the use of erectile dysfunction drugs – at the time, in 2000, Viagra was the only erectile dysfunction drug available.

More than 10,000 men said they had used Viagra. Over the next ten years, 14 of those men developed melanoma, meaning that approximately 8.6 of every 1,000 men who took Viagra developed melanoma. Among those who said they had never taken the drug, only about 4.3 of every 1,000 respondents developed melanoma.

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TylenolThe dangerous drug lawyers at Pintas & Mullins report on two recent injury cases centering on popular over-the-counter children’s painkillers. Both lawsuits were filed against Johnson & Johnson, the manufacturer of Tylenol and Motrin Children’s products.

The first case concerned the death of an 11-year-old boy who was given liquid Children’s Tylenol in 2011. Hours after taking the drug, the boy was rushed to the hospital with pneumonia, which eventually led to sepsis. The boy died of septic shock just a few days later.

Pneumonia is most commonly caused by bacteria and viruses; once it was confirmed her son had suffered bacterial pneumonia, his mother, Kindra Robertson, researched the potential sources of infection. She soon realized the batch of Children’s Tylenol she gave her son had been recalled for bacterial contamination. She had the bottle tested, and it was found to be positive for bacteria.

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BoyMore than 1,600 Risperdal injury claims are currently pending in Philadelphia court, all of which allege the antipsychotic drug caused female breast tissue development in young men. The first three trials have concluded in massive wins for the injured plaintiffs. Our Risperdal attorneys are currently representing young men who developed gynecomastia from this drug.

Gynecomastia is caused by an imbalance of hormones in males, leading to the swelling of breast tissue. Although it is not life-threatening, it can be difficult to cope with, cause physical pain and social isolation, and may require surgery.

Risperdal is a powerful antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The drugmaker knew Risperdal posed specific health risks to children, including elevating a hormone called prolactin, which stimulates breast growth and milk production. It also knew that this particular side effect was far more common in adolescent males than any other demographic, but chose to focus its marketing efforts on pediatricians, claiming the drug was safe and effective for a number of childhood disorders and even paying doctors to prescribe the drug to its adolescent patients. During this time, however, Risperdal was only approved to treat adults with schizophrenia or bipolar.

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