Articles Posted in Dangerous Side Effects

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debtOur Abilify lawyers are currently accepting cases involving compulsive behavior. The FDA recently added warnings to Abilify’s labels detailing the drug’s link to uncontrollable urges for sex, gambling, shopping, and eating.

Abilify (aripiprazole) is prescribed to treat depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, among other mental disorders. It is prescribed to approximately 1.6 million Americans.

Since Abilify’s approval 14 years ago, the FDA has gathered information on the drug from patients, doctors and medical literature. By far the most common problem associated with Abilify is pathological gambling. All patients who experienced problematic side effects started the compulsive behavior after beginning Abilify, and all patients said their symptoms stopped or significantly reduced after stopping the drug.

If you’re interested in reading more detailed cases of specific Abilify side effects, check out our first blog on Abilify gambling lawsuits.

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cash syringeOur Xarelto lawyers know all too well that Big Pharma hides important data from the public to protect their most profitable drugs. There are thousands of death and injury claims against Xarelto  federal court, where a legal briefing was just filed accusing the manufacturers of misleading editors of one of the world’s most respected medical journals.

Patients injured by Xarelto – a popular blood thinner – are suing its manufacturers, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and Bayer, because the drug can cause uncontrollable, fatal bleeding. These wrongful death and injury lawsuits accuse the companies of concealing important safety information and failing to test the drug fully before releasing it for sale.

To prove these claims in court, Xarelto lawyers recently pointed to a letter published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). The letter was written by Duke University researchers and led to the FDA’s approval of Xarelto in 2011.

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gamblingAbilify, a powerful antipsychotic medication, is the top-selling drug in the United States, earning more in sales than all other major anti-depressants combined. The drug is intended to treat depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Tourettes by changing patients’ behavior. Sadly, studies have linked Abilify to reward-seeking behaviors like gambling and compulsive spending, causing the destruction of families, careers and personal lives.

Our team of Abilify lawyers examines the link between Abilify and gambling and the lawsuits filed against its manufacturer.

Abilify was approved in 2002 in the same class of drugs as Seroquel, Risperdal and Zyprexa. It may surprise many to know that neither the FDA nor doctors understand exactly how Abilify works in helping mental illness. There is a proposed theory of mechanism, but no medical research or evidence to confirm it. Abilify is the only antipsychotic that acts on the dopamine system, however, which may hold the key to the development or worsening of uncontrollable urges.

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ViagraTwo years ago, a study was published linking Viagra to a heightened risk of melanoma, the most fatal form of skin cancer. We wrote about the study previously, here, but our team of Viagra lawyers wants to update our readers on recent expert opinions and Viagra lawsuit news.

In the 2014 study, researchers had more than 200,000 men fill out a health and lifestyle questionnaire every two years, for one decade. The questionnaire included questions about the use of erectile dysfunction drugs – at the time, in 2000, Viagra was the only erectile dysfunction drug available.

More than 10,000 men said they had used Viagra. Over the next ten years, 14 of those men developed melanoma, meaning that approximately 8.6 of every 1,000 men who took Viagra developed melanoma. Among those who said they had never taken the drug, only about 4.3 of every 1,000 respondents developed melanoma.

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TylenolThe dangerous drug lawyers at Pintas & Mullins report on two recent injury cases centering on popular over-the-counter children’s painkillers. Both lawsuits were filed against Johnson & Johnson, the manufacturer of Tylenol and Motrin Children’s products.

The first case concerned the death of an 11-year-old boy who was given liquid Children’s Tylenol in 2011. Hours after taking the drug, the boy was rushed to the hospital with pneumonia, which eventually led to sepsis. The boy died of septic shock just a few days later.

Pneumonia is most commonly caused by bacteria and viruses; once it was confirmed her son had suffered bacterial pneumonia, his mother, Kindra Robertson, researched the potential sources of infection. She soon realized the batch of Children’s Tylenol she gave her son had been recalled for bacterial contamination. She had the bottle tested, and it was found to be positive for bacteria.

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ambulanceA man in Florida started using Testim and AndroGel in 2005 for diminishing testosterone levels, or “Low T.” Over the next two years, Michael Seaburn suffered two heart attacks and has since filed suit against the gels’ manufacturers. The testosterone therapy lawyers at Pintas & Mullins detail this lawsuit and others like it we are currently handling.

Dubious Marketing for a Contrived Condition

You have undoubtedly seen commercials for men with “Low T,” a made-up condition describing the decline in testosterone all men experience with age. These commercials describe the natural effects of aging in men – changes in sexual function, increased body fat, reduced muscle strength, less energy, and sleep disturbances – and bill them as symptoms of Low T. Companies market their testosterone gels and products like AndroGel and Testim as cures to Low T, as the ultimate anti-aging formula.

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spilled pillsThe FDA recently added new warnings to the type 2 diabetes drugs Invokana and Invokamet, citing the increased risk of bone fractures. This comes only about six months after the FDA warned about a dangerous blood problem called diabetic ketoacidosis, which can be fatal. Our team of Invokana lawyers is currently accepting claims related to diabetic ketoacidosis and kidney damage from this drug.

The risk of bone density loss and fractures was already included on Invokana and Invokamet’s labels. After new clinical trials and reports from clinicians, the FDA decided to strengthen the warnings. The agency noted that fractures occur more frequently and earlier than previously believed. New data confirms that fractures can occur as early as 12 weeks into treatment.

Further, fractures often occur from minor incidents, like falling from standing height. Areas of the body most likely to break include the lower spine and hip.

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white pillsFor decades, statins like Lipitor and Crestor were the first line of treatment to help regulate cholesterol levels. Two drugs in a new class of cholesterol medicines called PCSK9 inhibitors were recently approved by the FDA. As we saw with statins causing type 2 diabetes, drugs meant to benefit patients in one way often end up harming them in a completely different way. The question facing doctors, patients and the medical industry now is, will these new drugs do more harm than good?

The first line of debate has centered on how much these new drugs – Praluent and Repatha – cost. The first drug approved, Praluent, showed in studies to reduce LDL cholesterol by up to 60%, which is significantly higher than statins. Despite this, there is not any data showing Praluent actually reduces heart attacks, strokes and heart disease. The studies measuring these real-life outcomes are not expected until 2017.

The companies that manufacture Praluent and Repatha announced the drugs would cost upwards of $14,000 per patient per year, which is double the cost in Europe. This is exorbitantly high, considering most patients are put on cholesterol-lowering drugs for the rest of their lives.

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PregnancyThe Zofran lawyers at Pintas & Mullins are currently accepting cases of birth defects in children whose mothers took this anti-nausea drug during pregnancy. Many patients are surprised and angry to learn that Zofran has never been approved to treat morning sickness; it is only FDA-approved to treat nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiotherapy or after surgery.

Zofran and Zuplenz work by blocking serotonin in the area of the brain that triggers nausea and vomiting. Zofran was the first drug of its kind to be approved, in 1991, and is manufactured by Big Pharma giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). Nausea from chemotherapy and other treatments is not a large market, so GSK quickly recognized it needed to expand its target patient to those outside cancer centers. Who else suffers from consistent and sometimes debilitating nausea? Pregnant women.

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Bottle pileIn June 2014, a team of researchers discovered that men who had ever taken Viagra were at an increased risk of developing melanoma, compared to those who never took the drug. There is currently no warning on Viagra’s labels suggesting this risk. Our team of Viagra lawyers is currently investigating cases of skin cancer development from this drug.

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